Image Credit: Huntington Theatre Company  - Jonathan Louis Dent, Toccarra Cash, Patricia R. Floyd, and Maurice E. Parent

SKELETON CREW: ENGLISH TEKS

English I

[110.31 & 110.36]

Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Theme & Genre

(2)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Theme and Genre. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about theme and genre in different cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts and provide evidence from the text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:

(A)  analyze how the genre of texts with similar themes shapes meaning;

(B)  analyze the influence of mythic, classical and traditional literature on 20th and 21st century literature; and

(C)  relate the figurative language of a literary work to its historical and cultural setting.

Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Drama

(4)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Drama. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of drama and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to explain how dramatic conventions (e.g., monologues, soliloquies, dramatic irony) enhance dramatic text.

Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Fiction

(5)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Fiction. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of fiction and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:

(A)  analyze non-linear plot development (e.g., flashbacks, foreshadowing, sub-plots, parallel plot structures) and compare it to linear plot development;

(B)  analyze how authors develop complex yet believable characters in works of fiction through a range of literary devices, including character foils;

(C)  analyze the way in which a work of fiction is shaped by the narrator's point of view; and

(D)  demonstrate familiarity with works by authors from non-English-speaking literary traditions with emphasis on classical literature.

Foundational Language Skills

(1) Developing and sustaining foundational language skills: listening, speaking, discussion, and thinking--oral language. The student develops oral language through listening, speaking, and discussion. The student is expected to:

(A) engage in meaningful and respectful discourse by listening actively, responding appropriately, and adjusting communication to audiences and purposes;

Comprehension Skills

(4) Comprehension skills: listening, speaking, reading, writing, and thinking using multiple texts. The student uses metacognitive skills to both develop and deepen comprehension of increasingly complex texts. The student is expected to:

(A) establish purpose for reading assigned and self-selected texts;

(B) generate questions about text before, during, and after reading to deepen understanding and gain information;

(C) make and correct or confirm predictions using text features, characteristics of genre, and structures;

(D) create mental images to deepen understanding;

(E) make connections to personal experiences, ideas in other texts, and society;

(F) make inferences and use evidence to support understanding;

(G) evaluate details read to determine key ideas;

(H) synthesize information from two texts to create new understanding; and

(I) monitor comprehension and make adjustments such as re-reading, using background knowledge, asking questions, and annotating when understanding breaks down.

Multiple Genres

(6) Multiple genres: listening, speaking, reading, writing, and thinking using multiple texts--literary elements. The student recognizes and analyzes literary elements within and across increasingly complex traditional, contemporary, classical, and diverse literary texts. The student is expected to:

(A) analyze how themes are developed through characterization and plot in a variety of literary texts;

(B) analyze how authors develop complex yet believable characters in works of fiction through a range of literary devices, including character foils;

(C) analyze non-linear plot development such as flashbacks, foreshadowing, subplots, and parallel plot structures and compare it to linear plot development; and

(D) analyze how the setting influences the theme.

Author's Purpose & Craft

(8) Author's purpose and craft: listening, speaking, reading, writing, and thinking using multiple texts. The student uses critical inquiry to analyze the authors' choices and how they influence and communicate meaning within a variety of texts. The student analyzes and applies author's craft purposefully in order to develop his or her own products and performances. The student is expected to:

(A) analyze the author's purpose, audience, and message within a text;

(B) analyze use of text structure to achieve the author's purpose;

(C) evaluate the author's use of print and graphic features to achieve specific purposes;

(D) analyze how the author's use of language achieves specific purposes;

(E) analyze the use of literary devices such as irony and oxymoron to achieve specific purposes;

(F) analyze how the author's diction and syntax contribute to the mood, voice, and tone of a text;

Inquiry & Research

(11) Inquiry and research: listening, speaking, reading, writing, and thinking using multiple texts. The student engages in both short-term and sustained recursive inquiry processes for a variety of purposes. The student is expected to:

(A) develop questions for formal and informal inquiry;

English II

[110.32 & 110.37]

Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Theme & Genre

(2)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Theme and Genre. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about theme and genre in different cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts and provide evidence from the text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:

(A)  compare and contrast differences in similar themes expressed in different time periods;

(B)  analyze archetypes (e.g., journey of a hero, tragic flaw) in mythic, traditional and classical literature; and

(C)  relate the figurative language of a literary work to its historical and cultural setting.

Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Drama

(4)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Drama. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of drama and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to analyze how archetypes and motifs in drama affect the plot of plays.

Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Fiction

(5)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Fiction. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of fiction and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:

(A)  analyze isolated scenes and their contribution to the success of the plot as a whole in a variety of works of fiction;

(B)  analyze differences in the characters' moral dilemmas in works of fiction across different countries or cultures;

(C)  evaluate the connection between forms of narration (e.g., unreliable, omniscient) and tone in works of fiction; and

(D)  demonstrate familiarity with works by authors from non-English-speaking literary traditions with emphasis on 20th century world literature.

Foundational Language Skills

1) Developing and sustaining foundational language skills: listening, speaking, discussion, and thinking--oral language. The student develops oral language through listening, speaking, and discussion. The student is expected to:

(A) engage in meaningful and respectful discourse by listening actively, responding appropriately, and adjusting communication to audiences and purposes;

(4) Comprehension skills: listening, speaking, reading, writing, and thinking using multiple texts. The student uses metacognitive skills to both develop and deepen comprehension of increasingly complex texts. The student is expected to:

(A) establish purpose for reading assigned and self-selected texts;

(B) generate questions about text before, during, and after reading to deepen understanding and gain information;

(C) make and correct or confirm predictions using text features, characteristics of genre, and structures;

(D) create mental images to deepen understanding;

(E) make connections to personal experiences, ideas in other texts, and society;

(F) make inferences and use evidence to support understanding;

(G) evaluate details read to determine key ideas;

(H) synthesize information from multiple texts to create new understanding; and

(I)  monitor comprehension and make adjustments such as re-reading, using background knowledge, asking questions, and annotating when understanding breaks down.

Comprehension Skills

(4) Comprehension skills: listening, speaking, reading, writing, and thinking using multiple texts. The student uses metacognitive skills to both develop and deepen comprehension of increasingly complex texts. The student is expected to:

(A) establish purpose for reading assigned and self-selected texts;

(B) generate questions about text before, during, and after reading to deepen understanding and gain information;

(C) make and correct or confirm predictions using text features, characteristics of genre, and structures;

(D) create mental images to deepen understanding;

(E) make connections to personal experiences, ideas in other texts, and society;

(F) make inferences and use evidence to support understanding;

(G) evaluate details read to determine key ideas;

(H) synthesize information from two texts to create new understanding; and

(I) monitor comprehension and make adjustments such as re-reading, using background knowledge, asking questions, and annotating when understanding breaks down.

Response Skills

(5) Response skills: listening, speaking, reading, writing, and thinking using multiple texts. The student responds to an increasingly challenging variety of sources that are read, heard, or viewed. The student is expected to:

(A) describe personal connections to a variety of sources, including self-selected texts;

(B) write responses that demonstrate understanding of texts, including comparing texts within and across genres;

(C) use text evidence and original commentary to support an interpretive response;

(D) paraphrase and summarize texts in ways that maintain meaning and logical order;

(E) interact with sources in meaningful ways such as notetaking, annotating, freewriting, or illustrating;

(F)  respond using acquired content and academic vocabulary as appropriate;

(G) discuss and write about the explicit or implicit meanings of text;

(H) respond orally or in writing with appropriate register, vocabulary, tone, and voice;

(I)  eflect on and adjust responses when valid evidence warrants; and

(J)  defend or challenge the authors' claims using relevant text evidence.

Multiple Genres

(6) Multiple genres: listening, speaking, reading, writing, and thinking using multiple texts--literary elements. The student recognizes and analyzes literary elements within and across increasingly complex traditional, contemporary, classical, and diverse literary texts. The student is expected to:

(A) analyze how themes are developed through characterization and plot, including comparing similar themes in a variety of literary texts representing different cultures;

(B) analyze how authors develop complex yet believable characters, including archetypes, through historical and cultural settings and events;

(C) analyze isolated scenes and their contribution to the success of the plot as a whole; and

(D) analyze how historical and cultural settings influence characterization, plot, and theme across texts.

Author's Purpose & Craft

(8) Author's purpose and craft: listening, speaking, reading, writing, and thinking using multiple texts. The student uses critical inquiry to analyze the authors' choices and how they influence and communicate meaning within a variety of texts. The student analyzes and applies author's craft purposefully in order to develop his or her own products and performances. The student is expected to:

(A) analyze the author's purpose, audience, and message within a text;

(B) analyze use of text structure to achieve the author's purpose;

(C) evaluate the author's use of print and graphic features to achieve specific purposes;

(D) analyze how the author's use of language informs and shapes the perception of readers;

(E) analyze the use of literary devices such as irony, sarcasm, and motif to achieve specific purposes;

(F)  analyze how the author's diction and syntax contribute to the mood, voice, and tone of a text;

English III

[110.33 & 110.38]

Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Theme & Genre

(2)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Theme and Genre. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about theme and genre in different cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts and provide evidence from the text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:

(A)  analyze the way in which the theme or meaning of a selection represents a view or comment on the human condition;

(B)  relate the characters and text structures of mythic, traditional, and classical literature to 20th and 21st century American novels, plays, or films; and

(C)  relate the main ideas found in a literary work to primary source documents from its historical and cultural setting.

Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Drama

(4)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Drama. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of drama and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to analyze the themes and characteristics in different periods of modern American drama.

Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Fiction

(5)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Fiction. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of fiction and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:

(A)  evaluate how different literary elements (e.g., figurative language, point of view) shape the author's portrayal of the plot and setting in works of fiction;

(B)  analyze the internal and external development of characters through a range of literary devices;

(C)  analyze the impact of narration when the narrator's point of view shifts from one character to another; and

(D)  demonstrate familiarity with works by authors in American fiction from each major literary period.

Foundational Language Skills

1)  Developing and sustaining foundational language skills: listening, speaking, discussion, and thinking--oral language. The student develops oral language through listening, speaking, and discussion. The student is expected to:

(A)  engage in meaningful and respectful discourse when evaluating the clarity and coherence of a speaker's message and critiquing the impact of a speaker's use of diction and syntax;

(D)  participate collaboratively, offering ideas or judgments that are purposeful in moving the team toward goals, asking relevant and insightful questions, tolerating a range of positions and ambiguity in decision making, and evaluating the work of the group based on agreed-upon criteria.

Comprehension Skills

(4)  Comprehension skills: listening, speaking, reading, writing, and thinking using multiple texts. The student uses metacognitive skills to both develop and deepen comprehension of increasingly complex texts. The student is expected to:

(A)  establish purpose for reading assigned and self-selected texts;

(B)  generate questions about text before, during, and after reading to deepen understanding and gain information;

(C)  make and correct or confirm predictions using text features, characteristics of genre, and structures;

(D)  create mental images to deepen understanding;

(E)  make connections to personal experiences, ideas in other texts, and society;

(F)  make inferences and use evidence to support understanding;

(G)  evaluate details read to understand key ideas;

(H)  synthesize information from a variety of text types to create new understanding; and

(I)   monitor comprehension and make adjustments such as re-reading, using background knowledge, asking questions, annotating, and using outside sources when understanding breaks down.

Response Skills

(5)  Response skills: listening, speaking, reading, writing, and thinking using multiple texts. The student responds to an increasingly challenging variety of sources that are read, heard, or viewed. The student is expected to:

(A)  describe personal connections to a variety of sources, including self-selected texts;

(B)  write responses that demonstrate analysis of texts, including comparing texts within and across genres;

(C)  use text evidence and original commentary to support an analytic response;

(D)  paraphrase and summarize texts in ways that maintain meaning and logical order;

(E)  interact with sources in meaningful ways such as notetaking, annotating, freewriting, or illustrating;

(F)  respond using acquired content and academic vocabulary as appropriate;

(G) discuss and write about the explicit and implicit meanings of text;

(H) respond orally or in writing with appropriate register and effective vocabulary, tone, and voice;

(I)  reflect on and adjust responses when valid evidence warrants; and

(J)  defend or challenge the authors' claims using relevant text evidence.

Multiple Genres

(6)  Multiple genres: listening, speaking, reading, writing, and thinking using multiple texts--literary elements. The student recognizes and analyzes literary elements within and across increasingly complex traditional, contemporary, classical, and diverse literary texts. The student is expected to:

(A)  analyze relationships among thematic development, characterization, point of view, significance of setting, and plot in a variety of literary texts;

(B)  analyze how characters' behaviors and underlying motivations contribute to moral dilemmas that influence the plot and theme;

(C) evaluate how different literary elements shape the author's portrayal of the plot; and

(D)  analyze how the historical, social, and economic context of setting(s) influences the plot, characterization, and theme.

(7)   Multiple genres: listening, speaking, reading, writing, and thinking using multiple texts--genres. The student recognizes and analyzes genre-specific characteristics, structures, and purposes within and across increasingly complex traditional, contemporary, classical, and diverse texts. The student is expected to:

(C)  analyze how the relationships among dramatic elements advance the plot;

Author's Purpose & Craft

(8)  Author's purpose and craft: listening, speaking, reading, writing, and thinking using multiple texts. The student uses critical inquiry to analyze the authors' choices and how they influence and communicate meaning within a variety of texts. The student analyzes and applies author's craft purposefully in order to develop his or her own products and performances. The student is expected to:

(A)   analyze the author's purpose, audience, and message within a text;

(B)   evaluate use of text structure to achieve the author's purpose;

(C)   evaluate the author's use of print and graphic features to achieve specific purposes;

(D)  evaluate how the author's use of language informs and shapes the perception of readers;

(E)   evaluate the use of literary devices such as paradox, satire, and allegory to achieve specific purposes;

(F)  evaluate how the author's diction and syntax contribute to the mood, voice, and tone of a text;

English IV

[110.34 & 110.39]

Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Theme & Genre

(2)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Theme and Genre. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about theme and genre in different cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts and provide evidence from the text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:

(A)  compare and contrast works of literature that express a universal theme;

(B)  compare and contrast the similarities and differences in classical plays with their modern day novel, play, or film versions; and

(C)  relate the characters, setting, and theme of a literary work to the historical, social, and economic ideas of its time.

Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Drama

(4)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Drama. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of drama and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to evaluate how the structure and elements of drama change in the works of British dramatists across literary periods.

Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Fiction

(5)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Fiction. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of fiction and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:

(A)  analyze how complex plot structures (e.g., subplots) and devices (e.g., foreshadowing, flashbacks, suspense) function and advance the action in a work of fiction;

(B)  analyze the moral dilemmas and quandaries presented in works of fiction as revealed by the underlying motivations and behaviors of the characters;

Foundational Language Skills

1) Developing and sustaining foundational language skills: listening, speaking, discussion, and thinking--oral language. The student develops oral language through listening, speaking, and discussion. The student is expected to:

(A) engage in meaningful and respectful discourse when evaluating the clarity and coherence of a speaker's message and critiquing the impact of a speaker's use of diction, syntax, and rhetorical strategies;

Comprehension Skills

(4)  Comprehension skills: listening, speaking, reading, writing, and thinking using multiple texts. The student uses metacognitive skills to both develop and deepen comprehension of increasingly complex texts. The student is expected to:

(A) establish purpose for reading assigned and self-selected texts;

(B)  generate questions about text before, during, and after reading to deepen understanding and gain information;

(C) make and correct or confirm predictions using text features, characteristics of genre, and structures;

(D) create mental images to deepen understanding;

(E) make connections to personal experiences, ideas in other texts, and society;

(F) make inferences and use evidence to support understanding;

(G)  evaluate details read to analyze key ideas;

(H) synthesize information from a variety of text types to create new understanding; and

(I)  monitor comprehension and make adjustments such as re-reading, using background knowledge, asking questions, annotating, and using outside sources when understanding breaks down.

Response Skills

(5) Response skills: listening, speaking, reading, writing, and thinking using multiple texts. The student responds to an increasingly challenging variety of sources that are read, heard, or viewed. The student is expected to:

(A) describe personal connections to a variety of sources, including self-selected texts;

(B) write responses that demonstrate analysis of texts, including comparing texts within and across genres;

(C) use text evidence and original commentary to support an evaluative response;

(D) paraphrase and summarize texts in ways that maintain meaning and logical order;

(E) interact with sources in meaningful ways such as notetaking, annotating, freewriting, or illustrating;

(F) respond using acquired content and academic vocabulary as appropriate;

(G) discuss and write about the explicit and implicit meanings of text;

(H) respond orally or in writing with appropriate register and purposeful vocabulary, tone, and voice;

(I)    reflect on and adjust responses when valid evidence warrants; and

(J)   defend or challenge the authors' claims using relevant text evidence.

Multiple Genres

(6)  Multiple genres: listening, speaking, reading, writing, and thinking using multiple texts--literary elements. The student recognizes and analyzes literary elements within and across increasingly complex traditional, contemporary, classical, and diverse literary texts. The student is expected to:

(A) analyze relationships among thematic development, characterization, point of view, significance of setting, and plot in a variety of literary texts;

(B) analyze how characters' behaviors and underlying motivations contribute to moral dilemmas that influence the plot and theme;

(C) critique and evaluate how complex plot structures such as subplots contribute to and advance the action; and

(D) evaluate how the historical, social, and economic context of setting(s) influences the plot, characterization, and theme.

Author's Purpose & Craft

(8) Author's purpose and craft: listening, speaking, reading, writing, and thinking using multiple texts. The student uses critical inquiry to analyze the authors' choices and how they influence and communicate meaning within a variety of texts. The student analyzes and applies author's craft purposefully in order to develop his or her own products and performances. The student is expected to:

(A) evaluate the author's purpose, audience, and message within a text;

(B) evaluate use of text structure to achieve the author's purpose;

(C) evaluate the author's use of print and graphic features to achieve specific purposes;

(D critique and evaluate how the author's use of language informs and shapes the perception of readers;

(E) evaluate the use of literary devices such as paradox, satire, and allegory to achieve specific purposes;

(F)  evaluate how the author's diction and syntax contribute to the effectiveness of a text; and

(G)  analyze the effects of rhetorical devices and logical fallacies on the way the text is read and understood.